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"I've got people saying what is your image? Who gives a fuck? I just play the role."  -Russell Crowe
 The World of Film in Australia - on the Internet Updated Monday, October 23, 2017 

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JACKMAN & WHITE: ERSKINEVILLE KINGS JACKMAN & WHITE: ERSKINEVILLE KINGS
Erskineville Kings is an ironic title for a drama about two brothers trying to face their family demons within their respective male psyches; writer/director Alan White and co-star Hugh Jackman talk to ANDREW L. URBAN on a footpath in Noosa.
  JACKMAN, HUGH - REAL STEEL
In Real Steel Hugh Jackman plays a dad on screen after being a real dad and experiencing its frustrations, he tells Andrew L. Urban.
JACKMAN, HUGH: KATE AND LEOPOLD JACKMAN, HUGH: KATE AND LEOPOLD
After playing an 18th century Duke with impeccable manners in Kate & Leopold, Hugh Jackman is hoeing into the tuna to bulk up for his role as Wolverine in X-Man 2, he tells Jenny Cooney Carrillo, but the romance thing has rubbed off.
JACKMAN, HUGH: PAPERBACK HERO JACKMAN, HUGH: PAPERBACK HERO
Andrew L. Urban talks to Paperback Hero star Hugh Jackman on location in outback Queensland and at a villa in Cannes, and finds him unaffected by the accolades coming his way.
JACKMAN, HUGH: SOMEONE LIKE YOU JACKMAN, HUGH: SOMEONE LIKE YOU
He’s called one the sexiest men alive (as per the magazine photo shoots) but Hugh Jackman still takes out the garbage, he tells Jenny Cooney Carrillo, even after co-starring with Ashley Judd, Meg Ryan and John Travolta. (Pic courtesy David Morgan)
JACKMAN, HUGH: X-Men JACKMAN, HUGH: X-Men
How does HUGH JACKMAN feel on the verge of international superstardom? Calm and perhaps a little naïve. Or as they say in vaudeville, ‘I’m living in Egypt, right next to Denial!’ he tells Jenny Cooney Carrillo.
  JACKSON, PETER – WEST OF MEMPHIS
Why did Peter Jackson and Fran Walsh spend millions of their own money on the defence of a stranger halfway across the world in Arkansas and $2 million more on the documentary - West of Memphis - about the case? And what does Satan have to do with it? Andrew L. Urban put the questions to Jackson on the eve of the film’s Australian release (February 14, 2013).
JACKSON, PETER:  THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING JACKSON, PETER: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING
Peter ‘Tolkien’ Jackson brings Middle-earth to life and is King of New Zealand; now he wants to try hypnotherapy (as long as it’s reversible) so he can see his own film with a blank mind, he tells Andrew L. Urban, after the sensational Wellington premiere of The Fellowship of The Ring.
JACOBI, SIR DEREK : Love is the Devil JACOBI, SIR DEREK : Love is the Devil
Undaunted by the unsavoury character, Sir Derek Jacobi flings himself into the role of Francis Bacon – a pig of a man – in the much acclaimed film, Love is the Devil. Jacobi talks to ANDREW L. URBAN.
  JACOBS, STEVE & HAINES, JESSICA – DISGRACE
Disgrace was one of three Australian films in Competition at the 2009 Sydney Film Festival; J. M. Coetzee’s novel was identified as a terrific potential film by Australian writer/producer Anna-Maria Monticelli, who convinced her director husband Steve Jacobs to do it, and helped cast Jessica Haines in the crucial role of the protagonist’s daughter, Lucy. It was a challenging experience, Jacobs and Haines tell Andrew L. Urban in this audio interview.
JANE HORROCKS - LITTLE VOICE JANE HORROCKS – LITTLE VOICE
Best known for her role as Bubble in the cult TV classic Absolutely Fabulous, Jane Horrocks gets to show off how absolutely fabulous she really is, playing a shy young woman able to burst into song as Judy Garland or Marilyn Monroe. In this exclusive interview, PAUL FISCHER met the diminutive star of stage and screen.
  JARECKI, ANDREW: CAPTURING THE FRIEDMANS - THE CLOWN'S SECRET
Filmmaker Andrew Jarecki set out to make a film about professional children’s party clowns in New York. After months of interviewing David Friedman, the most successful of these clowns, Jarecki discovered the secret story of the Friedmans – two of whom had been charged with child sexual abuse. David Freidman, one of the sons of the indicted father, decided to help tell the story - supported by extraordinary home videos. Jarecki takes a FAQ on his film.
  JARMUSCH, JIM – BROKEN FLOWERS
Why did actor Jeffrey Wright frequently call the Ethiopian Embassy during the shoot of Broken Flowers? Why did Jim Jarmusch get each of his four female stars to write a letter to Bill Murray’s character, Don? These and many other questions, put by Jason Simos, are answered in this entertaining interview with one of America’s most interesting filmmakers, whose latest film was one of the hits of Cannes 2005, winning the Grand Prix.
  JARRATT, JOHN – DJANGO UNCHAINED
Quentin Tarantino had himself blown up repeatedly – just for fun – during the making of Django Unchained, as John Jarratt tells Andrew L. Urban.
JASON LEIGH, JENNIFER : Washington Square JASON LEIGH, JENNIFER : Washington Square
Jennifer Jason Leigh plays the tormented Catherine in Washington Square. At the film's North American premiere during last year's Toronto Film Festival, Leigh confesses to PAUL FISCHER that the shy, introverted Catherine is a lot like her.
  JENKINS, RICHARD – THE VISITOR
After a lifetime of playing character roles, Richard Jenkins plays the lead in Tom McCarthy’s The Visitor, a role for which McCarthy always had him in mind. That’s sweet and flattering, but also frightening, Jenkins tells Andrew L. Urban.
JEUNET, JEAN-PIERRE: FABULOUS DESTINY OF AMÉLIE JEUNET, JEAN-PIERRE: FABULOUS DESTINY OF AMÉLIE
Jean-Pierre Jeunet, the director of Amélie, France’s official foreign language Academy entry for 2002, offers some extraordinary insights into the making of the film, from the original casting of Emily Watson to the first time he shot outside a studio (to capture Paris) and the reason he wants to make films that make people dream – and feel happy.
JEWISON, NORMAN: THE HURRICANE JEWISON, NORMAN: THE HURRICANE
Norman Jewison, the Canadian director of that seminal 1967 film about racism and injustice, In the Heat of the Night, was at the Berlin Film Festival in February 2000, with his new film about racism and injustice, The Hurricane. And things haven't changed that much, he tells DAVID EDWARDS.
  JIMEOIN – THE EXTRA
Jimeoin is a stand up comic and scriptwriter who knows the value of fame and fate: he has had lots of first hand experience at both, as well as at anonymity, a subject he tackles in The Extra, his latest film. Andrew L. Urban meets the man who plays the nobody and still gets the girl.
JOFFE, MARK : The Matchmaker JOFFE, MARK : The Matchmaker
The original script was "crappy" but the changes made it a perfect match for Mark Joffe, the Australian director who made The Matchmaker, he tells PAUL FISCHER.
JOFFE, MARK: THE MAN WHO SUED GOD JOFFE, MARK: THE MAN WHO SUED GOD
One simple idea gave birth – 10 years later – to a comedy that plays with the notion of Acts of God, starring Billy Connolly and Judy Davis. Director Mark Joffe tells Andrew L. Urban why it was an irresistible idea.
JOHANSSON,SCARLETT  Horse Whisperer JOHANSSON,SCARLETT Horse Whisperer
Teenage actress Scarlett Johansson (pictured with Robert Redford) talks about getting good scripts to PAUL FISCHER.
  JOHNSON, SAMUEL – THE ILLUSTRATED FAMILY DOCTOR
In real life, Samuel Johnson is better at being sad than at being happy, he tells Andrew L. Urban, so his role as the melancholy Gary Kelp in The Illustrated Family Doctor was just the opportunity for him to step up to a leading role – as an anti hero. But he was terrified he’d fall foul of the ‘flimsy tricks’ and bad habits acquired over years of acting in commercial television.
JOHNSON, STEPHEN: YOLNGU BOY JOHNSON, STEPHEN: YOLNGU BOY
A universal if tragic story of three young friends trying to find themselves while caught between cultures in a remote community, Yolngu Boy is the result of collaboration between the real Yolngu community and the filmmakers; and director Stephen Johnson explains to Andrew L. Urban why his being white has got nothing to do with it.
  JOLIE, ANGELINA – TAKING LIVES
In Taking Lives, Angelina Jolie has to lie in a grave – but it didn’t freak her out at all; she has always been a friend to the darker things in life. But while she’s busy making movies, she is also busy working on a project to help Cambodia. Our Los Angeles correspondent, Jenny Cooney Carrillo reports.
JOLIE, ANGELINA: LARA CROFT - TOMB RAIDER JOLIE, ANGELINA: LARA CROFT - TOMB RAIDER
Award winning actors should never take themselves too seriously, Angelina Jolie tells Jenny Cooney Carrillo as she tackles the role of Lara Croft.
  JONES, TOMMY LEE – THREE BURIALS
The compleat Q & A with Texas-born Tommy Lee Jones, star and director and driving force behind The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, winner of Best Actor award at Cannes 2005, where Guillermo Arriaga’s screenplay was also voted best of the competition. From deer hunting in California to the badlands between Texas and Mexico, and the stories that touch our hearts.
JORDAN GREGOR: Two Hands JORDAN GREGOR: Two Hands
Two Hands got the nod from the pro crims in the audience, which augurs well for its success; but Gregor Jordan learnt more than how to write well in his debut feature, and is set to make three films with Miramax as a result. ANDREW L. URBAN spoke to him on the eve of the film’s commercial release.
  JORDAN, GREGOR: BUFFALO SOLDIERS
A dark and edgy film about the American military directed by Gregor Jordan, before he made Ned Kelly, was completed just before September 11, 2001. It’s taken this long to get the star-studded film out to the public, as Jordan explains to David Edwards
JORDAN, GREGOR: NED KELLY JORDAN, GREGOR: NED KELLY
To director Gregor Jordan, Australia’s most famous bushranger, Ned Kelly was a natural, charismatic leader of men who could have risen to great heights in politics – had circumstances been different. That’s part of the tragedy, he tells Andrew L. Urban.
JOVOVICH, MILLA; JOAN OF ARC JOVOVICH, MILLA; JOAN OF ARC
Milla Jovovich herself didn't put much stock in the legend of Joan. "It was a story I never believed in. It's very strange to play her because I just never took it seriously. There's not a person there. It's just an icon. It's a phrase, it's an adjective. Everything except a human being." Until director Luc Besson came along . . .





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