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ELIZABETHTOWN: DVD

SYNOPSIS:
Drew Baylor (Orlando Bloom) is suicidal after losing his job when his sport shoe design loses his company a fortune. But he has to snap out of it at least momentarily when his father dies back in remote Elizabethtown, Kentucky, their home town. On his way home to for the burial, his flight attendant is the irrepressible Claire (Kirsten Dunst), who takes a liking to him and becomes a guardian angel bringing him an unexpected reversal of his gloomy state, with her joie de vivre.

Review by Louise Keller:
There's no doubt that Cameron Crowe's heart is in the right place, but Elizabethtown probably works better as a tribute to his late father (to whom the film is dedicated) than the uplifting romantic comedy to which he aspires. Kirsten Dunst is the film's bright shining star, and the best scenes are those when her effervescent Claire establishes a relationship with Orlando Bloom's lackluster Drew. But the story is self-serving and the bulk of the plot involving dozens of relatives intent on organising a fitting tribute to Drew's father who has just died, never flows naturally.

Bloom's Drew is going through a big dip in his life. Just when he thought things couldn't get any worse, and when business failure turns into major fiasco, the obligations and responsibility that come with his father's death are yet another thing on his conscience. As the older child and the man of the family, it is up to him to head for Kentucky and meet rooms full of strangers who act as though they know him intimately.

There are some funny moments, and there is a wonderful scene when Drew arrives in his hotel room and leaves voicemail messages for his family, his ex-girlfriend and the airhostess he just met on the plane. They all ring back at once, of course, and the fun starts when Drew juggles all the calls. The scene also offers the film's best line, when he tells his sister Heather (Judy Greer) he will call her back, to which, she spits out 'Dial hell and I'll answer.' Another highlight is the first phone conversation between Drew and Claire, when they exchange intimacies as they each are doing mundane things. She is having a bath, painting her toenails, emptying the kitty litter; he is taking a leak and washing his undies. They wonder aloud whether their relationship has peaked while on the phone.

But ultimately the film is overlong and the climactic tribute scene in which Susan Sarandon's widow Hollie surprises everyone, falls flat. Crowe labours his point and Drew's final journey home is both contrived and derivative.

There are some extended scenes on the DVD, together with Meet the Crew featurette, photo gallery, trailers and more.

Published February 16, 2006



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ELIZABETHTOWN: DVD (M)
(US, 2005)

CAST: Kirsten Dunst, Orlando Bloom, Susan Sarandon, Jessica Biel, Alec Baldwin

PRODUCER: Cameron Crowe, Tom Cruise, Paula Wagner

DIRECTOR: Cameron Crowe

SCRIPT: Cameron Crowe

CINEMATOGRAPHER: John Toll

EDITOR: Mark Livolsi, David Moritz

MUSIC: Nancy Wilson

PRODUCTION DESIGN: Clay A. Griffith

RUNNING TIME: 138 minutes

AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR: UIP

AUSTRALIAN RELEASE: November 3, 2005

PRESENTATION: Widescreen

SPECIAL FEATURES: Extended scenes; Meet the Crew featurette; photo gallery; training wheels; trailers

DVD DISTRIBUTOR: Paramount

DVD RELEASE: February 9, 2006







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