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TWENTY FOUR SEVEN

SYNOPSIS:
Twentyfourseven is British slang for working at a project around the clock, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, a rather generic term that could apply to almost anything but in this case to the labour of a feisty guy who pledges himself to working with disaffected youth. Alan Darcy (Bob Hoskins) works in the English Midlands (Nottingham and environs) trying to give a sense of purpose to a gang of teen wrecks -dopers and the like - who wander the depressing housing projects without a single healthy conviction. Enlisting the financial aid of a shadowy businessman named Ronnie Marsh (Frank Harper), Alan signs up his reluctant targets by winning a bet with them on the soccer field. He soon has a colourful group in his charge including the most self-destructive Gadget (Justin Brady), the overweight son of the financier who becomes Alan's assistant manager, and others who are as undisciplined as they are, in their way, charming. To bond the group further, he takes them (again despite their reluctance) on a car trip to Wales, where they fish, enjoy the Spartan scenery, and have a jolly old time. Back home, the boys get into their training with lust, punching the bags, showing up regularly and on time, and looking forward to their first competition against a team known as the Staffordshire Terriers. What happens in the ring when one of Alan's disciples gets pummelled is both comical and sad. The result of some local mayhem results in permanent changes in the lives of the boys and Alan as well.

"Steven Meadow’s striking debut film Twentyfourseven is a passionate tale, effectively told in an individual, distinctive style and starkly shot in moody black and white. Although the formation of a boxing club lies at the heart of the story, this is not a story about boxing as such. It’s a jolting and powerful look at the heart of humanity through a complex character whose salvation lies in helping the town’s youth gain self control and respect. Bob Hoskins’ tour de force performance delicately balances bravado, sensitivity and insight, and takes us on an emotional journey with him. His will to give the young locals a sense of purpose is paramount to his own sense of worth and respect. Hoskins moulds Darcy into a complex little man with a huge heart. His acute loneliness and insecurities lie well below a rough, tough exterior. It’s a great ensemble cast, with naturalistic and moving performances all round. The art of communication lies in building up confidences, relationships and giving people a sense of need and worth. Darcy’s psychology could well teach many a psychiatrist a thing or two. Hoskins will amaze you - he will make you smile, cry, warm to him, but most of all, be profoundly moved by a rich, complex and convincing performance. Twentyfourseven is a low budget film, rich in passion and brimming over with a sense of reality."
Louise Keller

"Twentyfourseven is an auspicious debut for writer/director Shane Meadows. Beautifully shot in black and white, and featuring a truly hypnotic performance by Bob Hoskins, the film gives a stark picture of the poverty- stricken Midlands, yet manages to inject some sardonic humour against the starkness of her characters. It's a tough film, a gritty, credible and often poetic drama, but it manages to avoid sentiment and a tendency to 'Americanise' the material with cliches and predicability. It's a film about believing in yourself under the most dire circumstances. There's a point in the film where Darcy says "It doesn't matter how much or how little you have, if you have nothing to believe in, then you'll always be poor." Twentyfourseven is a hauntingly powerful and deeply moving work, your atypical and richly textured boxing flick, which shows that this first-time director has a solid future in front of her, and that Hoskins is one of the great, and most underrated, stars of the British cinema."
Paul Fischer

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CRITICAL COUNT
Favourable: 2
Unfavourable: 0
Mixed: 0
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TWENTYFOURSEVEN (M) 15+
(UK)

CAST: Danny Nussbaum, Bob Hoskins, Bruce Jones, Annette Badland, Justin Brady, James Hoooton, Darren Campbell, Krishan Beresford, Karl Collins, Anthony Clark

DIRECTOR: Shane Meadows

PRODUCER: Imogen West

SCRIPT: Shane Meadows, Paul Fraser

CINEMATOGRAPHER: Ashley Rowe

EDITOR: Bill Diver

MUSIC: Neil MacColl, Boo Hewerdine

PRODUCTION DESIGN: John-Paul Kelly

RUNNING TIME: 97 minutes

AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR: Dendy Films

AUSTRALIAN RELEASE: June 25, 1998

AUSTRALIAN VIDEO RELEASE: May 26, 1999
VIDEO DISTRIBUTOR: Dendy Video







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