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OCCASIONAL COARSE LANGUAGE

SYNOPSIS:
Like most girls her age, Min Rogers (Sara Browne) has had her ups and downs – but at 22 she felt things were finally starting to go her way – and then the phone rings. Suddenly, she’s out of a job, out of a boyfriend and out on the street. But Jaz (Astrid Grant) will know what to do, as always. And David (Nick Bishop) seems like a nice guy to live with (wrong!). . . pass the blonde . . .OK, what about Stanley Michael Walker)? Jaz said it was over between them, anyway. Promises are made, loyalties tested and friendships stretched. Then the phone rings. Whose place for Melrose?

"Contemporary young urban lives under the microscope don’t come much fresher than this, not since Love and Other Catastrophes. But while Love …Catastrophes was made by a young female filmmaker, this is made by a male, though its focus on the central female characters might suggest otherwise. But that’s partly its appeal: a surprisingly insightful script with a well balanced battle of the sexes which results in entertaining cinema, at once light-handed yet meaningful. The fresh cast, none with any previous acting experience, shine in every scene, turning in natural performances, often with depth and sensitivity. I especially like Astrid Grant’s wonderful, complete characterisation of Jaz. The slice of life story holds up well, especially as Hayward resists the temptation to find easy devices with which to manipulate our feelings in respect of his central character, Min. While she does have a journey with an upbeat conclusion, it is not so pat and not so neat as to be fake. It’s just typically Australian and optimistic. In style terms, the playful jump cuts in some scenes work to good effect, and the camera work overall is suitably lively without being frenetic. Well chosen music underlines the contemporary tone. And there’s only occasional coarse language."
Andrew L. Urban

"Brad Hayward’s debut feature can be summed up in one word - funky! Funky attitude, funky music, funky script and a funky young cast make this an invigorating tonic for those jaded by Oz Noir. Occasional Coarse Language captures a time and a place in life we’ve all been to, but most of us would prefer to forget - that awkward phase where you haven’t fully cut the family ties, but you’re still finding your way in the world. Love, study, money, friendship, work, commitment, fun, reality and mind altering substances make a powerful mix which some drink with gusto while others prefer to sip cautiously. Sara Browne and Astrid Grant make the young women caught up in the heady excitement of it all believable and real; although it must be said that some of the minor characters are rather stereotyped and Stanley seems just a little too good to be true. The story moves at pace, pumped along by a soundtrack featuring contemporary Australian artists. Possibly the first film to use its title as a consumer advisory, Occasional Coarse Language has some of the funniest lines of any film this year. But beyond the snappy dialogue, it has a heart too. Fresh, original and a damn good time at the movies, this is a film could start a whole new genre - Oz Funky."
David Edwards

"Occasional Course Language may be a bit on the rough side, and is far from perfect. The script is a bit patchy, and Brad Hayward's debut direction sometimes jumps around. But then, films don't always need to be glossy and sophisticated, and one measure of a film's success is its ability to accurately reflect society. This film communicates to the young, in a brash, funny and often insightful way. It is a real charmer of the film, full of genuine spark and consistent energy, engaging the audience in the ups and downs of contemporary youth. What's more, it has the indefatigable presence of Sara Browne. A drama student with no film experience, Browne exudes spunk, intellect and comic virtuosity as the hapless heroine of this film. She's beautifully aided by another newcomer in Astrid Grant, who's a delight as Min's best pal. Occasional Course Language is bound to be unduly criticised for all the wrong reasons, but what it does, is it sums up what Australia is all about: the ability to have a go, and the film does that. The industry has, of late, been somewhat safe, somewhat conservative in the kinds of movies it makes. Here's a filmmaker taking a brash view of urban Australian youth, and going for it."
Paul Fischer

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CRITICAL COUNT
Favourable: 3
Unfavourable: 0
Mixed: 0

SARA BROWNE INTERVIEW

OCCASIONAL COARSE LANGUAGE (M)
(Australia)

CAST: Sara Browne, Astrid Grant, Nick Bishop, Michael Walker, Lisa Denmeade, Belinda Hoare, Michelle Fillery

DIRECTOR: Brad Hayward

PRODUCERS: Brad Hayward, Trish Piper

SCRIPT: Brad Hayward

CINEMATOGRAPHER: Jonathan Biggins

EDITOR: Simon Martin

MUSIC SUPERVISION: Brett Oaten

PRODUCTION DESIGN: Rebecca Barry

RUNNING TIME: 81 minutes

AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR: Roadshow

AUSTRALIAN RELEASE DATE: November 26, 1998

AUSTRALIAN VIDEO RELEASE: May 4, 1999
AUSTRALIAN VIDEO DISTRIBUTOR: Roadshow Entertainment







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