Urban Cinefile
"After I read his books I feel like I have a fist indentation in my solar plexus "  -director Darren Aronofsky about his adaptation of Requiem for a Dream from a Hubert Selby Jr novel
 The World of Film in Australia - on the Internet Updated Wednesday, October 18, 2017 

Search SEARCH FOR A VIDEO_FILE
Our Review Policy OUR REVIEW POLICY
Printable page PRINTABLE PAGE

Help/Contact

INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE

SYNOPSIS: We always knew they were coming back. Using recovered alien technology, the nations of Earth have collaborated on an immense defense program to protect the planet. But nothing can prepare us for the aliens' advanced and unprecedented force. Only the ingenuity of a few brave men and women can bring our world back from the brink of extinction.

Review by Louise Keller:
The plot and dialogue get a bit fuzzy at times, but the film plays as expected: a boys own adventure generously endowed with scale, stupendous visual effects and a blend of old and new characters that rally together to save the world. Twenty years after the original film, director Roland Emmerich relies on the formulaic, placing the accent on action, relationships and humour, ensuring all the boxes are ticked for the fans.

Highlights include the sequence in which the destruction of the world begins, when skyscrapers, cars and people are lifted high into the sky. It's an extraordinary, eerie sight and as Jeff Goldblum's David Levinson says: What goes up must come down. Goldblum is a strong presence throughout as the head of the space defense program whose involvement is strategizing how to deal with the new threat of an alien spaceship diameter of which is a hefty 3,000 miles. Bill Pullman's former US President Whitmore, initially frail and elderly takes out his Gillette blades and shaves off his full white beard, which immediately enables him to discard his walking stick and become heroic. Brent Spiner as Dr Okun, the long-haired mad scientist is also back along with Levinson's kooky dad Julius (Judd Hirsch), who comically ends up driving a bus-load of kids towards Area 51.

Then there are the newbies: two pilots Jake and Dylan (Liam Hemsworth and Jesse Usher), who have a conflicted history, President Whitmore's pilot daughter Patricia (Maika Monroe) who is engaged to Jake plus decorative Chinese actress/model Angelababy. Sela Ward as the new President has little to do, but Charlotte Gainsbourg as a French specialist who has a history (and chemistry) with Levinson, is good value. I like Deobia Oparei as Dikembe, the African warlord with a great face and a violent disposition, while William Fichter exudes authority as military top dog.

The film looks spectacular although I would have preferred if Emmerich had left a little more to the imagination. We get to see the aliens close up and frequently. And yes, there is green slime. As for the details of the plot, some of it went over my head, although it is impossible to miss the final resolution in a dramatic and extended finale. For those to whom size matters, this is the film for you!

Email this article

CRITICAL COUNT
Favourable: 1
Unfavourable: 0
Mixed: 0

INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (M)
(US, 2016)

CAST: Liam Hemsworth, Jeff Goldblum, Bill Pullman, Maika Monroe, Joey King, William Fichtner, Jessie Usher, Vivica A. Fox, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Brent Spiner, Sela Ward, Angelababy, Judd Hirsch

PRODUCER: Dean Devlin, Roland Emmerich, Herald Kloser

DIRECTOR: Roland Emmerich

SCRIPT: Nicolas Wright, James A. Woods, Dead Devlin, Roland Emmerich, James Vanderbilt

CINEMATOGRAPHER: Markus Forderer

EDITOR: Adam Wolfe

MUSIC: Herald Kloser, Thomas Wanker

PRODUCTION DESIGN: Barry Chusid

RUNNING TIME: 120 minutes

AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR: 20th Century Fox

AUSTRALIAN RELEASE: June 23, 2016







Urban Cinefile 1997 - 2017