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DIVORCING JACK

SYNOPSIS:
Dan Starkey (David Thewlis) is a hard-drinking satirical journalist with the Belfast Evening News. When Starkey is caught by his wife Patricia (Laine Megaw) in the arms of Margaret (Laura Fraser), the daughter of Prime Ministerial candidate Michael Brinn (Robert Lindsay)'s right hand man, the politics begin to get heated. Starkey is caught in the middle of a murder, a political scandal, as he tries to rescue his floundering marriage. Along the way, Starkey meets a gun-toting nurse, who provides him with temporary shelter.

"It's funny, witty, dry and black but underneath the froth and laughs lie deep serious issues set on a political backdrop in troubled Belfast. David Caffrey's passionate film teeters from quirky romance to bloodied thriller to offbeat comedy with one liners that amuse rather than give a belly laugh. David Thewlis, after a few glum roles in Total Eclipse and Seven Years in Tibet, shows what he's made of in this role of the satirical columnist on a local newspaper. Thewlis swings easily from his clown with the sharp one-liners, to the weak, romantic philanderer and terrified victim. Rachel Griffiths is super in a small but showy role, which is not only controversial, but hugely entertaining. Some may be offended by the casual approach to some of the violence, but the integrity of the film remains strong, portraying great empathy and understanding for how a society in a troubled land copes and lives on a day to day basis. The styles of music are as diverse as the plots, with the score a pendulum, expressing the moods of the moment. The deeper issues of love, betrayal, greed and social comment pulsate throughout the film, while the zany, irreverent humour stretches from serious to comic. The meaning of the title? I won't spoil it by telling but it's clever and very funny. Divorcing Jack is an impressive debut from a bold, gutsy filmmaker who explores life's pains with liberal doses of wry humour."
Louise Keller

"Divorcing Jack is a film that's going to divide audiences, but then in many ways, that's the mark of a good film. Love it or hate it, it's an undeniably fresh and original work, a funny, biting satire on political journalism and low-life politics. The film has, in its central character, an antihero who redefines the notion of cynical, and as played by the wonderful Thewlis, he is a joy, aided by an incomparable comic turn by Griffiths as a nurse with a difference. Divorcing Jack is the kind of film that needs one's undivided attention. It's a smart, witty and furiously fast film that doesn't keep still or spel things out to its audience. Thus is the power of Colin Bateman's sharp-edged script, full of nicely etched characters and frenetic situations. Deliciously funny and at times twisted, Divorcing Jack is a sly and energetic comedy that is wonderfully unpredictable and entertaining."
Paul Fischer

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CRITICAL COUNT
Favourable: 2
Unfavourable: 0
Mixed: 0

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TRAILER

SOFCOM MOVIE TIMES

DIVORCING JACK
(UK/FR)

CAST: David Thewlis, Rachel Griffiths, Robert Lindsay, Jamon Isaacs, Laura Fraser, Richard Gant, Bronagh Gallagher

DIRECTOR: David Caffrey

PRODUCER: Robert Cooper

SCRIPT: Colin Bateman (based on his novel)

CINEMATOGRAPHER: James Welland

EDITOR: Nick Moore

MUSIC: Adrian Johnston

PRODUCTION DESIGN: Claire Kenny

RUNNING TIME: 110 minutes

AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR: New Vision

AUSTRALIAN RELEASE: April 29, 1999

VIDEO RELEASE: August 25, 1999

VIDEO DISTRIBUTOR: 21st Century







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