Urban Cinefile
"We all know that somebody can be a terrific guy but things he does on the side may makes you go, Eergh, he really does that?"  -Jackie Collins
 The World of Film in Australia - on the Internet Updated Saturday, December 16, 2017 

Search SEARCH FOR A VIDEO_FILE
Our Review Policy OUR REVIEW POLICY
Printable page PRINTABLE PAGE

Help/Contact

GET OUT

SYNOPSIS:
Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya) is a young African-American photographer who has been dating his Caucasian girlfriend Rose (Allison Williams) for five months. They drive to Rose's parents' (Bradley Whitford, Catherine Keener) mysterious country estate for the weekend, where strange things start to happen.

Review by Louise Keller:
The runaway hit of the year: this is a must-see film. First time director Jordan Peele has created a wonderful genre film in which everything feels fresh. It might sound familiar (white girl brings black boyfriend home to meet her parents) but it plays out in such a way that this psychological thriller with horror trim will have you perched on the edge of your seat from go to whoa. It's the scariest film I've seen in a long while - mostly because it creeps into your head and won't let go.

By the time the words 'Get Out' are uttered, we have already been seduced - and spooked - by mind games, strange happenings and a reality in which black and white is more than a monochromic description. 'The pendulum has swung back; black is in fashion,' is a line to remember. Racial satire is key to the action and Peele (known for his comedy sketch performances) has a great feel for the integration of comedy into the dramatic tension; knowing how far he can go with his audience and make them enjoy the ride.

After a chilling opening sequence in a leafy neighbourhood at night complete with pizzicato strings and strange musical harmonies, we meet Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), an up and coming photographer and his pretty girlfriend Rose (Allison Williams) in their city love-nest, preparing for a weekend in the country. 'Do they know I'm black?' Chris asks with the kind of anxiousness reserved for someone who wants to make a good impression. From the outset Peele builds tension using genre conventions for punctuation: sudden noises, music cues, dark shadows.

On arrival, Rose's parents Dean and Missy (Bradley Whitford and Catherine Keener) quickly point out the remoteness of their location offers 'total privacy'. There is something unusual about the zombie-like black hired help (Marcus Henderson, Betty Gabriel) and Rose's brother Jeremy (Caleb Landry Jones) is very strange indeed.

All the cast is excellent and British actor Kaluuya (Sicario) is perfect as the protagonist; it is through his eyes that the action plays out. Comedian LilRel Howery is fun as Chris' friend Rod, the security agent who is suspicious of everything.

Watch out for the scene in which Missy hypnotizes Chris in the dead of night, sending him to 'a sunken place'. It is terrifying. Add the group of well-dressed guests (including a blind art dealer) whose behavior is outright peculiar and the scene is a set for a nightmare weekend. Then Peele slams his foot on the pedal and ...

For maximum impact and enjoyment, it is best not to know too much; just let the characters, situations and unthinkable happenings seep into your consciousness.

It's a ripper. Don't see it alone!

Email this article

CRITICAL COUNT
Favourable: 1
Unfavourable: 0
Mixed: 0

GET OUT (MA15+)
(US, 2017)

CAST: Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Catherine Keener, Bradley Whitford, Caleb Landry Jones, Marcus Henderson, Betty Gabriel

PRODUCER: Jason Blum, Sean McKittrick, Jordan Peele

DIRECTOR: Jordan Peele

SCRIPT: Jordan Peele

CINEMATOGRAPHER: Toby Oliver

EDITOR: Gregory Plotkin

MUSIC: Michael Abels

PRODUCTION DESIGN: Rusty Smith

RUNNING TIME: 104 minutes

AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR: Universal

AUSTRALIAN RELEASE: May 4, 2017







Urban Cinefile 1997 - 2017