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 The World of Film in Australia - on the Internet Updated Thursday, April 24, 2014 - Edition No 894 

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OUT TO SEA

SYNOPSIS:
Herb (Jack Lemmon) and Charlie (Walter Matthau) have been lifelong friends since Herb married Charlie's sister many years ago. While Charlie is a habitual bad luck loser at gambling, Herb has become a recluse since his wife's death a few years past. In need of money, Charlie comes up with a new get rich scheme and signs himself up with Herb as dance instructors on a cruise ship. Herb wants to leave the ship once he learns of his new "job," but finds himself stuck on board as the ship sets out to sea. The tyrannical cruise director, Gil Godwyn (Brent Spiner), spots the two as imposters right away and warns them against fraternising with the passengers. Once at sea, Charlie moves into high gear as he plans on sweet-talking his way into a rich, single woman's life hoping that his future bride-to-be will take care of his financial problems. He sets his sights on Texas divorcee Liz LaBreche (Dyan Cannon), a wealthy oil woman who already has another suitor, Collin Carswell (Edward Mulhare). Meanwhile, a vacationing widow, Vivian (Gloria Dehaven), has her eye on Herb, but he still longs for his dead wife. As the men try to figure out how to deal with the new women in their lives, they must also deal with Godwyn who, when not trying to impress the ship's owner, Mrs. Carruthers (Rue McClanahan), is trying to prove that these two older men aren't real dance instructors.

"What this newest and 8th re-teaming of the ageless Lemmon and Matthau reminds one of, is how few of today's Hollywood's stars are likely to be working at that age and with that sense of timeless stardom. While the duo's choice of material is far from perfect, for actors in their eighties to be working more than your Cruises or your Pitts, has to do with what really makes a film star, and Out to Sea has more genuine stardom than in contemporary Hollywood. Essentially, this is an old-fashioned simplistic romantic comedy about two old codgers rediscovering life, and one who grows up under the tutelage of Dyan Cannon. Now here's a message to all you would-be supermodels out there: at 62, Cannon is more desirable and sexy than many of her more youthful counterparts. And while Lemmon and Matthau do their routine perfectly, the fabulous Cannon still lights up the screen. There are also nice star turns from the wonderful Donald O'Connor. No longer dancing on walls, he does, however, dance a soft shoe shuffle in this film that is breathtaking. Out to Sea is a hoot, a well-written vehicle for this venerable odd couple, beautifully directed by the reliable Martha Coolidge. As usual, Matthau steals the film, Lemmon is the sentimentalist and it remains a classic combination. Stardom is an indefinable quality, and while today's young may not appreciate it, Out to Sea is proof enough that it genuinely exists in spades."
Paul Fischer



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OUT TO SEA (M)
(US)

 

CAST: Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau, Dyan Cannon, Gloria DeHaven, Brent Spiner, Elaine Stritch, Hal Linden, Donald O’Connor, Edward Mulhare, Rue McClanahan

DIRECTOR: Martha Coolidge

PRODUCER: John Davis, David T. Friendly

SCRIPT: Robert Nelson Jacobs

CINEMATOGRAPHER: Lajos Koltai

EDITOR: Anne V.Coates

MUSIC: David Newman

PRODUCTION DESIGN: James Spencer

 

AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR: Fox

AUSTRALIAN RELEASE: August 21, 1997







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