Urban Cinefile
The Captive
 The World of Film in Australia - on the Internet Updated Thursday, November 27, 2014 - Edition No 925 

Search SEARCH FOR A NEWS_FILE
Our Review Policy OUR REVIEW POLICY
Printable page PRINTABLE PAGE

Newsletter Options - Registration is FREE Help/Contact

20/5/2001: CANNES 2001 – THE WINNERS

Two American directors shared the Best Director prize, an Austrian won the Grand Prix and an Italian won the Palme d’Or (and the film, The Piano Teacher, won the two Best Actor awards), but Australia’s entry, Moulin Rouge wasn’t mentioned when jury President Liv Ullman announced the winners. Nor was Joel Coen there to collect his directing award for The Man Who Wasn’t There, shared with David Lynch for Mulholland Drive, in which Australia’s Naomi Watts gives a tour de force performance.

Hosted by Paris resident Charlotte Rampling, the presentation ceremony lasted under 60 minutes, and highlights included Jodie Foster, (also in fluent French), who presented the Best Director awards, while Antonio Banderas and Melanie Griffith presented the Palme d’Or to Italy’s Nanni Moretti, whose win wasn’t a surprise. La stanza del figlio (The Son’s Room) is the story of Giovanni, Paola and their teenage children, who live in a small North Italian town. One morning Giovanni receives an urgent call from a patient; he’s unable to go running with his son as planned, who goes diving with friends instead and doesn’t return.

Austria’s Michael Haneke, the grey haired and bearded filmmaker was awed at the “rain” of awards for his French language film about a woman in her mid 30s who fails in her career as a virtuoso pianist in which she is tutored by her tyrannical mother. Stars Isabelle Huppert and Benoit Magimel took the acting honours. “It was an extraordinary adventure,” said Huppert, “but I wasn’t alone. I’m very happy, thank you.” Nick Nolte presented her with the award.

No Man’s Land, written by Danis Tanovic, won the Best Screenplay award and the Camera d’Or for best first film went to Zacharias Kunuk, the Canadian filmmaker for his drama, Atanarjuat The Fast Runner.

Liv Ullman began by explaining that sometimes she would love something and someone else would hate it – or vice versa. “But that we’re all still friends,” she added, “is because the dreams these films represent all stay with us.”
Andrew L. Urban



Email this article

Read Andrew L. Urban's WRAP of the festival

The FESTIVAL FILMS







© Urban Cinefile 1997 - 2014