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DOG SOLDIERS

SYNOPSIS:
A squad of British solders on a training exercise in Scotland led by Sgt Harry Wells (Sean Pertwee) stumbles onto the remains (too literally) of Capt Richard Ryan’s (Liam Cunningham) small team of Special Ops on a secret mission. They soon realise the enemy is all too real, all too terrifying and none too human. They think they’re saved when a young local woman, Megan (Emma Cleasby) picks them up in her jeep and takes them to a lonely farmhouse. They aren’t. Saved, that is. 


Review by Andrew L. Urban:
Strictly for the fang-orians, this attempt to revive the werewolf movie as a genre for the new millennium starts with great promise but bites the dust in a blood-soaked, brainless second half. Opening scenes have genuine grip as the scenario is established, young soldiers in a remote and rugged location, alone…unsure of their moral as well as physical terrain. The sense of foreboding is built with care, and Sam McCurdy’s cinematography is inspired. 

The underlying premise of the film is vaguely workable, but is soon blotched and blotted by unnecessary extensions. The genre demands less, not more. Act one works dramatically well, a change of style for the genre and a welcome one; here is a gritty and realistic scenario, peopled by credible characters. 

The actors take it all quite seriously, even when the script loses the plot, as it were. And McCurdy’s work is soon lost in a frenzied visual acceleration that resorts to frizzy hand held work, married to a sound design that’s pretty old hat. Conscious of the need for excess to divert attention from the silliness of it, Neil Marshall plays the gore card and trumps the genre with a large dose of the splatters. When Peter Jackson does it in a low budget, self-amusing fun flick like Braindead, there is merit in splatter. 

But Dog Soldiers (unfortunate title, that) is too self important to get away with it. The werewolves (and more than one is another mistake) are merely shadowy creatures, with nothing to lose and no way to be killed. The drama between the soldiers themselves is far more interesting, but not developed. And to make things much worse, Marshall himself not so much edits the film as throws into a blender.

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CRITICAL COUNT
Favourable: 0
Unfavourable: 1
Mixed: 0

TRAILER

DOG SOLDIERS (M15+)
(UK/Luxembourg)

CAST: Sean Pertwee, Kevin McKidd, Emma Cleasby, Liam Cunningham, Darren Moffit, Chris Robson, Leslie Simpson, Thomas Lockyer

PRODUCER: Christopher Figg, David E. Allen, Tom Reeve

DIRECTOR: Neil Marshall

SCRIPT: Neil Marshall

CINEMATOGRAPHER: Sam McCurdy

EDITOR: Neil Marshall

MUSIC: Mark Thomas

PRODUCTION DESIGN: Simon Bowles

RUNNING TIME: 105 minutes

AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR: Becker Entertainment

AUSTRALIAN RELEASE: March 20, 2003

VIDEO DISTRIBUTOR: Universal

VIDEO RELEASE: June 23, 2003 (Also on DVD)







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