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AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN PARIS, AN

SYNOPSIS:
Three wise cracking, 20-something American college kids Andy (Tom Everett-Scott), Brad (Vince Vieluf) and Chris (Phil Buckman) arrive in Paris intent on serious fun. Like bungee jumping off the Eifel Tower; but Serafine (Julie Delpy), a Parisian girl, is also intent on jumping, only she has no bungee. Andy’s impulsive bravado sends him after her, rescuing her mid-air. On the ground, she rushes off and he is concussed by a beam on the rebound. In hospital he awakes with a vision of her from the previous night. He must find her. With a discarded suicide note their only clue, the three guys set out to find this mystery woman, the woman of his dream – and on every full moon, the stuff of his worst nightmares, as it turns out. The search for Serafine leads them into the ancient catacombs beneath Paris, tunnels that criss cross the foundations of the city. Foreigners, itinerants and those whom nodoby shall miss are suspicioulsy disappearing at the time of every full moon. Inspector Leduc (Tom Novembre) is on the case, but it’s not an easy job, even for one with a Sherlock Holmes complex. The terror is unstoppable.

"A clever mixture of comedy and horror which succeeds in being both funny and scary, An American Werewolf . . . possesses an overriding eagerness to please that prevents it from becoming off putting, and special effects freaks get more than their money’s worth.’ That’s a quote from Variety’s review of John Landis’ 1981 film, An American Werewolf in London, the near-classic precursor to this late-but-worth-the-wait sequel. Written and directed by a man (Anthony Waller) whose biggest body of work is in tv commercials, this new adventure shifts from London to Paris, but the plot points and eagerness to entertain are the same. The SFX are not: this is 15 years and a whole digital shift later, and some of the effects work in this film (from animation to visual to digital FX) is quite extraordinary. Maybe a trifle unsettling before mealtime, but extraordinary. The undead, for example, who spring a blood leek from their cheeks when attempting a whistle (and worse, but I’ll spare you that); the transmutation sequences; the opening eye-popper involving a life saving jump from the top of the Eifel Tower - echoed in the new, ‘up’ ending achieved with a downward movement (I’m being obtuse to preserve the surprise for you); and the inventive lighting camera work when we see things from a werewolf’s point of view. There are several nice touches in both the casting and the gory-humour, while the suspense never lets up. By the movie’s end, you can feel you’ve seen something; your stomach muscles can relax."
Andrew L. Urban

"If you’re into horror, then this flick may capture your heart in more ways than one. Far fetched with imaginative flair, here’s a film that doesn’t take itself too seriously, but gives an appealing light edge to the script. With a genuinely exciting music score, American Werewolf is a well paced film that expertly takes its audience on a trip of anticipation, building tension and fear as it goes, culminating in explosions of horror, blood-letting and werewolf thrills. Much of the enjoyment is in the anticipation. And director Anthony Waller knows how to tease and make his audience savour what is to come. Julie Delpy as Serafine is bewitching; she is the gal whose solution for relaxing Andy (once she has told him of his new status) is unusual to say the least. Tom Everett Scott as Andy, gives a most convincing performance, and is reminiscent of a young Tom Hanks. Yes, there’s a little dip in the middle, the plot gets a fraction muddled and it’s a trifle long, but the skill of the film is how it manages to hold reality and disbelief at bay. For the squeamish, there are a few totally gross scenes: which are all counteracted by the humour. It’s good entertainment for vampire film lovers, especially when the moon is full."
Louise Keller

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CRITICAL COUNT
Favourable: 2
Unfavourable: 0
Mixed:0
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See Andrew L. Urban's interview with
TOM EVERETT SCOTT

AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN PARIS (M)
(US)

 

CAST: Julie Delpy, Tom Everett Scott, Vince Vieluf, Phil Buckman, Julie Bowen, Pierre Cosso, Tom Novembre, Thierry Lhermitte, Maria Machado

DIRECTOR: Anthony Waller

PRODUCER: Richard Claus

SCRIPT: Anthony Waller

CINEMATOGRAPHER: Egon Werdin

EDITOR: Peter R. Adam

MUSIC: Wilbert Hirsch

VISUAL EFFECTS ART DIRECTOR: Peter Lloyd

ANIMATION DIRECTOR: James Straus

DIGITAL EFFECTS: John Grower, Bruce Walters

PRODUCTION DESIGN: Matthias Kammermeier

RUNNING TIME: 102 minutes

 

AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR: REP

AUSTRALIAN RELEASE: January 29, 1998

AUSTRALIAN VIDEO DISTRIBUTOR: Becker Home Entertainment

AUSTRALIAN VIDEO RELEASE: May 27, 1998







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