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DORIS DAY COLLECTION: DVD

SYNOPSIS: 
Pillow Talk: Jan Morrow (Doris Day) is a successful interior decorator with no love life and Brad Allen (Rock Hudson) is a songwriter with plenty of love in his life. With absolutely nothing in common except a telephone party line, requiring each to take it in turns to make and receive phone calls, Brad and Jan irritate each other constantly and can’t help but get a glimpse of the other’s life style. But things take a sharp U-turn when Brad sees Jan, likes what he sees and pretends to be a visiting Texan, Rex Stetson. Jan falls helplessly in love, encouraged by her busybody housekeeper Alma (Thelma Ritter), despite the fact that she is engaged to wealthy client Jonathan Forbes (Tony Randall). But then Jan finds out the truth, and hell hath no fury like a woman deceived.


Review by Louise Keller:
Pillow Talk: A delightful romantic comedy that bears repeated viewing, Pillow Talk is both witty and funny, with compelling performances from Doris Day and Rock Hudson. In fact, the script won the Oscar in 1960, and the film had four other nominations: best actress, best supporting actress, best music and best art direction. (Day and Randall won best actress and best support actor gong at the Golden Globes in the same year). All the performances are superb, but my personal favourite is Thelma Ritter’s, whose nosy Alma features in some of the most memorable comedy scenes on film. Remember the scene when Brad takes Alma for a drink to pump her for information, but he is the one who ends up on his ear? “I've had hangovers before, but this time, even my hair hurts,” he complains. But Alma also has some good lines, such as “If there's anything worse than a woman living alone, it's a woman saying she likes it.” Filled with wonderful moments, there’s a running gag in which Brad pretends to write a special song for each of his (numerous) girlfriends: “You are my inspiration (Maree)…”. The film makes effective use of the split screen as Brad and Jan battle for control of the telephone line, and while the storyline may be predictable, it is nonetheless highly enjoyable. This is the film on which the recent Down With Love was based, and Pillow Talk remains one of my all-time favourite Doris Day films.

As well as Pillow Talk, this DVD Collection also features two other Doris Day, Rock Hudson and Tony Randall romantic comedies. – Lover Come Back (1961) and Send Me No Flowers (1964), in which Hudson plays a hypochondriac who believes he is about to die. Plenty of laughs plus plenty of charm in this classic collection.

Published October 30, 2003

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DORIS DAY COLLECTION (G)
(US)

CAST: (for Pillow Talk, Lover Come Back, Send Me No Flowers) Rock Hudson, Doris Day, Tony Randall, Thelma Ritter

DIRECTOR: various

SCRIPT: various

RUNNING TIME: various

PRESENTATION: cinemascope widescreen; audio 2.0

SPECIAL FEATURES: trailer

DVD DISTRIBUTOR: Universal

DVD RELEASE: October 22, 2003







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